The Pescatarian: A heavenly supper (9.6)

Food mesmerizes me, because I see in its creativity the parallel of poetry and music. There are more or less a given number of key ingredients to work with, but an infinite number of ways to combine them. When it works out, it’s magic, no less worthy than a grand masterpiece by Bach or a… Continue reading The Pescatarian: A heavenly supper (9.6)

Andō: Solid, but lacks wow factor (8.3)

Head Chef Agustin Balbi was born in Argentina, but spent time exploring culinary techniques in Japan. One could easily tell the latter's influence by his focus on attentively adorned small plates, substantial use of raw fish and seafood delicacies as well as the combination of common South American and Japanese ingredients. The Argentinian character, however,… Continue reading Andō: Solid, but lacks wow factor (8.3)

Sushi Mamoru: Still phenomenal (9.5)

Readers who know me probably know that I am not big on sushi. I often felt that the combination of fish and rice was not greater than its parts alone. I miss out on the minute details of either if I have to take them together in one bite. That, and the fact that I… Continue reading Sushi Mamoru: Still phenomenal (9.5)

Xinrongji: Well-deserved Michelin star (9.3)

I have had Xinrongji in Shanghai before the pandemic as a business treat, and then again in Hong Kong, but I was very pleased to visit it again with friends, where I could be forgiven for photographing during the meal's most eagerly anticipated moments. The food was wonderful and we all mindfully savored the meal… Continue reading Xinrongji: Well-deserved Michelin star (9.3)

Jean May: Loving work from the kitchen (8.9)

Jean May is named after Chef Tiffany Lo's grandmother, which immediately gives the place a personal touch and loving glow. Lo has trained under Pierre Koffmann, whose protégés include Tom Aiken and Gordon Ramsey, among a long list of reputable chefs all over the world. Bringing home skills from one of the most talented chefs… Continue reading Jean May: Loving work from the kitchen (8.9)

Sushi Mamoru: Phenomenal (9.5)

Mamoru means to protect, and in this case, it is to uphold the art and tradition of sushi making. To me, it also seems to serve as a reminder to preserve the passion for the highest quality. It sounds like an easy thing to say, but serious diners will be able to discern whether that… Continue reading Sushi Mamoru: Phenomenal (9.5)

Sushi Takenori: Beware (6.8)

This is by far the worst sushi experience for as long as I can remember. For loyals of Sushi Kohaku, do not fall into the trap. Sushi Takenori contacted Sushi Kohaku’s old customers (of which I am one) to offer them 20% off until the end of June (Sushi Kohaku is the old sushiya of… Continue reading Sushi Takenori: Beware (6.8)

Tokami: Outstanding (9.5)

We arrived promptly on Friday night and were the first to be seated in the center. It’s always a pleasure to be seated right in front of the action if one isn’t having a business meal or a catch-up session with a friend who will distract you from the food itself. The meal was a… Continue reading Tokami: Outstanding (9.5)

Roganic: Delicate flavors with a lot of zing (8.6)

I quite like Roganic. I didn't think I would. I have been to a good handful of restaurants playing with variations of nouvelle cuisine and, while I mostly walked out of those restaurants happy with my meal, there were not many that I wanted to return to as a regular. Partly that is because I… Continue reading Roganic: Delicate flavors with a lot of zing (8.6)

Carbone: Transposing to New York (8.9)

Carbone is a dashing choice for New York style Italian food. The menu is compact enough so that everything on it is what the house feels confident about presenting, but not so much that you feel that it severely limits your choice. The interior is classically designed with old school chandeliers and vintage floor tiles… Continue reading Carbone: Transposing to New York (8.9)